Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!

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From the series “New York by the bird”
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I don’t only work with Manhattan skylines, and sometimes, I like to put my feet on the skids (long metal platforms of a helicopter), I like to twist the harness and to be neither comfortable nor relaxed. I relish hovering my dear camera above the void (with a shoulder harness…), and thus doing it my conk as well. Despite the vertigo and the lump in my throat, it’s always interesting to look down. You get some amazing perspectives and some powerful dynamics, so many of them that you have the feeling to fish in Mongolian lakes (well, that’s because those are horns of plenty, trouts wise). Just feel the sweet iron curves and the smalls of the buildings’ backs. Oh yeah… Use some Barry white’s songs for the mood and enjoy the views above New York city!
It’s Times Square neighborhood:
- The strongest avenue here is broadway
- The other avenue, behind, is the 7th one
- Down right corner, the building with Allianz III logo is the Paramount Plaza, International Style, Emery Roth sons (fathers of hundreds of NYC skyscrapers) , 1971
- The almost flat building between the avenues is the Winter Garden Theatre (poor thing in the feet of giants), William Albert Swasey, 1911
- The building with the Buffalo logo (center) is the 750 7th avenue building (superb. Feel my sarcasm…), Post-modernism, Kevin Roth, 1989
- Finally, in the up left corner, the building in juxtaposed cubes is the Lehman Brothers building (don’t spit on your screen, please), Post-modernism, Kohn Pedersen, 1999
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Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!

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From the series “Blood of Calcutta”
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Many persons mix up style and subject, and it’s a mistake, at least I believe it. It’s a mistake because style is who you are, your wishes (toward a higher aspiration), desires (to communicate and so to please others) and pleasures (to smile at what you’ve done). It should be worked, detailed, understood before to practice any kind of arts. It’s the salt and pepper. It’s your personality you want to share with others; it’s your character you want to assume; it’s your ideas you want to defend. Art is sharing, it’s communication. To communicate, you need something to say. So if you’re not sure about your style, if you don’t define yourself, how to convince viewers about ideas and emotions you’re not sure to have? You can’t just act and mimic them. You know it’s shallow and produces too much emptiness (a paradox, isn’t it?). But when you know yourself a tiny little bit, all subjects can carry your identity, spiritually, emotionally, intellectually. Subjects can varied, you’re still in communion with them. They are you. Still, some themes consecrate better your soul than any others. Calcutta is this one for me. I like gritty images for more textures and a physical connection. So is Calcutta. I like stories flowing without abruptness. Calcutta is built in this way. I like shadows to imagine death inside. Calcutta again. I like light in the contrast, for outbreaks of life as though life was a miracle and a disease in the same time. So, yes, Calcutta is my style.
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Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!

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From the series “New York by the bird”
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We come back today on my 2nd favorite skyscraper in New York (the 1st one being the Lever House). So today, let’s contemplate the Chrysler building (Art Deco, 1930, by William Van Alen, 1048 ft, 320 m), and this time, indeed with the antenna… Where are we exactly? We are at the heart of Midtown (not geographically but physiologically). At the feet of the Chrysler is the 42nd street, with on the left the Met Life building (Brutalism, 1963, by Emery Roth, 808 ft, 246 m), which pinpoint Grand Central station (here present only with your creative imagination; I can’t do everything, right?). Behind this block, the pyramidal roof is part of the Helmsley building (Art Deco, 1929, by Whitney Warren). Now I drag you almost at the top left corner. We are on Park avenue, with 2 black towers here, the one on the left being the Chase building (International Style, 1961, by Skidmore, 707 ft, 215m), while across the avenue is the Chemical bank building (International Style, 1962, Emery Roth again, 687 ft, 210m). I know, it’s not my most literary text, but it’s holidays for me. And you know, if you visit New York, more you understand the styles, the periods, more you understand how Manhattan was built. More you form one body with the city. That’s helpful if you’re photographer. Because you have to feel the forms in order to find the dynamical lines.
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To buy this particular photo (in very limited edition) click on:
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To get an aerial photography specialized helicopter, visit one of my workshops, click on:

For a thousand photos on archival fine art prints, click on:

Some highlights of my work, click on:

Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!

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From the series “Congorilla”
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Rather than a fallen angel. I almost feel nostalgic of an age where Cro-Magnon men crossed the road of the Neanderthal neighbors. Of course, they were certainly rough, tough, even dirty, without knowledge about pasteurized cheese and hand sanitizer. Of course, it was certainly a violent era, with bad insulated caverns and infections of all kind. But I imagine the peace of those living without this goddamn introspection reaching the absurdity of death. Thoughts are chains, with small logical schemes by way of beads: 1 + 1 = 2 then 2 + 2 = 4, and at the end we die. Many small reasons together, ending up in absurdity. Long, long tome ago, when we have envisaged that death was unavoidably bringing to a close the chapter of our dear existence, we became depressed, inconsolable: we couldn’t unearth a purpose for our presence, a solution on how to think and understand the unreasonable death. Religions became a panacea since unverifiable and soothing. Dogmas on behalf of reason. Then happened wars, slavery and more death, but at least this downfall was intentional, in a way made human, logical, justifiable. I’m almost jealous of the gorilla, brother of Cro-Magnon, which wisely embraces the perverted thoughts as a moronic luxury.
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To get an aerial photography specialized helicopter, visit one of my workshops, click on:

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Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!

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Today, I wear for you the tour guide’s cap. Since the last NYC photo, we are a bit further up in Manhattan, still on the edge of the Financial district. You can see on the left (with the tiny bridges on it) the back of the Woolworth building (1913, neo-gothic, by Cass Gilbert, 792 feet, 241 meters). Mr Woolworth pays everything in cash with the five and ten cents coins coming from his chain of, well, five-and-ten-cents stores. Let’s continue the visit. To the right, near the frame, you will see a small spot under construction: it’s Ground Zero. By the way, the big cubic skyscraper in front of the building site is the 7 World Trade Center. Behind, the big ugly black mammoth is the 1 Liberty Plaza (1973, International Style II). Now, a bit more in the center of the photo, the black elegant pencil is the Millennium Hilton hotel (1992, Late modern). I told you before, we are on the edge of the Financial district. The big neighborhood, flat in appearance, and taking the center of this composition is the south of Tribeca. You should see Robert De Niro somewhere… This area is highly sensitive (Ground Zero, World Trade Center, Wall street) so I space out my flights above this part of New York city.
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To buy this particular photo (in very limited edition) click on:
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Come to listen the words beyond the photos. Each has a story!
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In all works you do on a city, you have to show, in one photo, that the street described by the visual signifiants is this unique place. Without title or text, the photo has to speak and say “I’m India” (at least for this example…). In New York, many signs breathe this city: the yellow taxi, the fire escapes, the wooden tanks. New York is almost by definition a visual icon. Calcutta is the easiest city in India to catch the essence. The “white” historical town, the Ambassador cabs, the landmarks, Calcutta says its name on a photo. But you need to capture more than that. I’ve created a concept for this city: the fractalized existence. It’s a barbarism. It’s my secret language (don’t laugh). Explanation: in Calcutta you see a chaos. Everything is moving in all conceivable directions. Everything, from the air (visible by the omnipresent dust) to the people and trams and human-pulled rickshaws and goats and so on. It’s like a Peléan eruption with a glowing cloud of existences flowing in the whole city. But in this chaos, there are patterns, like the fractals in the coastal design. There is an order. It’s life itself regulating this entire macrocosmos. You feel it when you’re standing and watching. You see thousands goals crossing each others in a subjacent harmony so powerful that you have to love and respect India for that. Beyond the noise, it’s pure life.
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To buy this particular photo (in very limited edition) click on:

____________________________________
To get an aerial photography specialized helicopter, visit one of my workshops, click on:

For a thousand photos on archival fine art prints, click on:

Some highlights of my work, click on:

To buy this particular photo (in very limited edition) click on:
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On this day, the helicopter had for flight plan to hover above Wall Street (indeed, I didn’t have good photos of Trinity church), with the pilot asked to stay at the lowest permitted altitude. Of course, after a while, bankers below didn’t appreciate to see this kind of black vulture; we have to leave Manhattan. But before to be kicked from my roost, I was able to make a series on this Greek revival memorial (the Federal Hall, the small lego brick in the middle, with the colonnade). Just at the crossroad of Wall street (the road from left to right, almost invisible) with Broad street (from the bottom up). In this area thickly built (you don’t see much of the sun, even in summer), it’s a relieve to find this 1830′s building so kitsch, made on plan worthy of Plato’s antique Greece. You imagine the oracle in the heart of this sanctuary, with the Pythia predicting the future. It would be a good idea for the bankers around to use it more often for their own financial predictions. Question of reliability, it should be wise.
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To get an aerial photography specialized helicopter, visit one of my workshops, click on:

For a thousand photos on archival fine art prints, click on:

Some highlights of my work, click on:

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